Tag: Helm
17 Nov 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Helm 2.0 stable release!

Kubernetes Helm, the package manager for Kubernetes, has released the 2.0.0 version of software. Helm 2 gives teams the tools to collaborate when creating, installing, and managing applications inside of Kubernetes.

With Helm you can…

  • Find pre-packaged software (charts) to install and use
  • Easily create and host your own packages
  • Install packages into any Kubernetes cluster
  • Query the cluster to see what packages are installed and running
  • Update, delete, rollback, or view the history of installed packages

Helm includes two components: The Helm CLI tool, and an in-cluster release manager named Tiller. The Tiller component is responsible for tracking and managing installed packages.

Helm was the missing piece that enabled us to deploy our healthcare application to Kubernetes in a HIPAA-compliant way. It's also made our development/acceptance infrastructure much easier to manage. -- Sean Knox, Director of Engineering, Able Health

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15 Nov 2016 in Jenkins, Deis Workflow, Helm

Running Jenkins Nodes on Kubernetes

A Component is Born

In this post, I'm going to demonstrate a new component called jenkins-node. jenkins-node is a new project that brings up a Jenkins slave on Kubernetes. It uses Helm to install into the cluster, connects to the Jenkins master and runs build executions in its workspace.

The Current Infrastructure

Before this project was conceived, we have several nodes running across the system:

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11 Nov 2016 in Deis Workflow, Helm

Workflow Helm charts - Signed, Sealed, Delivered, They're Yours

Workflow & Co., Now in Delicious Kubernetes Helm Flavor

You may have noticed Kubernetes Helm charts for Workflow and associated components being released, starting with Workflow v2.8.0. Though officially still experimental, we encourage users to try them out!

(As Helm nears its final 2.0.0 release, the Workflow team is currently putting the finishing touches on a migration strategy for upgrading clusters from Helm Classic to Helm. Stay tuned!)

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7 Nov 2016 in Community Meeting, Deis Workflow, Helm

November 2016 Community Meeting

Helm Nearing Stable Release

The Helm community is fast approaching a stable release. With two Release Candidates out in the wild as well as growing momentum around folks authoring charts, we couldn't be more excited!

If you haven't had a chance to play with Helm, check out the quickstart documentation and play with some stable charts.

Workflow 2.8 Release Review

Now that the Helm project is cutting Release Candidates it is time to start the migration process from Helm Classic to Helm 2.0. The Workflow team is now cutting experimental charts for Workflow using Helm 2.0! To try out these new charts, head over to the installation documentation. The Workflow team will be working on a migration path for Helm Classic to Helm 2.0 in the upcoming releases.

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21 Oct 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Helm Beta.1: Fixes, fixes, everywhere...

The Helm community has cut the first beta release for 2.0.0! Helm is now feature complete and the community is focusing on fixing bugs, general stability, and documentation.

If you haven't checked out Helm, now is a great time to jump in and help the team batten down the hatches.

As always, the great Helm community can be found in the #helm channel on the Kubernetes Slack.

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21 Oct 2016 in Helm

Getting Started Authoring Helm Charts

Helm is the package manager for Kubernetes. In my last post, I showed you how to install a Helm chart. Check that out if you're new to Helm or you just want a refresher.

In this post, I'm going to dig into the Helm chart authoring process to illustrate just how easy it is to get started.

I will build on our previous example: Apache Spark.

Since publishing my last post, the Spark chart is now available in the official Kubernetes chart repo. So I'll use this chart as a working example, and walk you through the bits and pieces that make it up.

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14 Oct 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Happy 1st Birthday Helm!

The Story Behind Helm

Happy 1st Birthday, Helm!

On October 15th, 2015, the project now known as Helm was born. Only one year in, Kubernetes Helm is part of the CNCF, and is marching toward the v2.0.0 release. And in every sense of the word, it is now a community-driven project. But the circumstances behind the creation of Helm read like a script for a Silicon Valley tech comedy.

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10 Oct 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Alpha.5: Rollback, history, UX improvements, dependency management

This is the final Helm alpha release for the 2.0.0 development cycle.

WARNING: This release is not backward compatible. We try hard to avoid compatibility breaks because we know it is an inconvenience to you. But we made a tough call: It is better to correct some of our design flaws now than force everyone to "live with them" for the entirety of the 2.0.0 lifecycle. We apologize for the inconvenience, and we don't plan on any other compatibility breaks between now and 2.0.0.

As always, we want to give a big ❤️ to the community, which has continued to find bugs, submit issues, fix things, and participate in conversations. If you'd like to be a part of the community, we invite you to join the Kubernetes Helm Slack channel, drop in on a Thursday Developer Call, and jump in on the GitHub issue queues.

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7 Sep 2016 in Helm, Kubernetes

Trusting Who's at the Helm

Last year at KubeCon in San Francisco, I first learnt about Helm—a sort of Homebrew for Kubernetes. It seemed too good to be true, so I dug deeper. Fast forward to today, and I find myself packaging applications with Helm.

In this post, I'll talk briefly about why Helm is so exciting, and then show you how to install and use one of the packages I wrote.

Why Use a Package Manager?

A team I worked with was deploying various components to Kubernetes, including: Zookeeper, etcd, Consul, Cassandra, Kafka, and Elasticsearch. Each one of these components was using a manifest file that someone on the team had written by hand, and then these manifest files had been improved over time. Each change, each improvement, reflecting some sort of knowledge or experience the team had gained.

But there are many teams across the world deploying these same components. And let's face it, most deploy situations are similar enough. So each one of these teams is, for the most part, duplicating each other's work.

But what if there was a way to avoid that? What if we could organise that collective knowledge and bring people together to collaborate on it.

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6 Sep 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Helm Alpha.4: Persistent Storage, Improved Status, Provenance Files, and API Version Checking

Helm 2.0.0-alpha.4 is the penultimate Helm Alpha release. This new version introduces four major changes:

  • ConfigMap storage is now the default backend. When you create a release with Helm, the release data will be stored in config maps in the kube-system namespace. This means releases are now persistent.
  • helm status got a much-needed overhaul, and now provides lots of useful information about the details of a release.
  • The Tiller server now checks the apiVersion field of manifests before loading a chart into Kubernetes. Now, for example, a chart that uses PetSets will stop early if it detects that the Kubernetes installation does not support PetSets.
  • Helm can now cryptographically verify the integrity of a packaged chart using a provenance file. To this end, helm package now has a --sign flag, and several commands now have a --verify flag.

In addition to these, the Helm community has added numerous improvements and bug fixes, including:

  • Fixing a bug that prevented some installations of Alpha.3 from executing helm list
  • Limiting the length of a release name
  • Adding an icon: field to Chart.yaml
  • Improving helm lint and helm upgrade

During this cycle, the Kubernetes Helm community surpassed 50 code contributors, many of whom have contributed multiple PRs! We cannot thank you enough. ❤️

Getting Started

This is the second release of Helm that includes pre-built client binaries.

To get started, download the appropriate client from the release, unpack it, and then initialize Helm:

$ helm init

This will configure your local Helm, and also install and configure the in-cluster Tiller component.

What's Next

The next release, Alpha.5, marks the last major feature release before we focus on stability. You can expect to see helm rollback implemented, along with better version support, and the addition of a dependencies: section in Chart.yaml.

After Alpha.5, the Helm team will focus on closing bugs and improving stability as we sail toward a Helm 2.0.0 final release.

10 Aug 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Helm Alpha.3: The biggest release yet!

Helm v2.0.0-Alpha.3 has many new features and improvements. It marks our biggest release yet. The Helm team owes a tremendous debt of gratitude to our outstanding community, which has been a source of ideas, issues, fixes, features, and encouragement. Thank you!

Alpha.3 also includes the first set of released binaries which means you no longer have to compile the project to start kicking the tires. Check out "Getting Involved" section for details.

Features

The headliner features are:

  • A new helm upgrade command can upgrade releases in place. We suggest using Kubernetes Deployments for maximum impact.
  • A vastly improved helm status command shows you information about the current state of your releases.
  • Helm now has commands for getting information about a release using helm get, helm get values, helm get hooks, and helm get manifest.
  • By default, releases are still stored in memory. But they may now optionally be stored in Kubernetes ConfigMaps instead. In subsequent releases, ConfigMaps will become the default.
  • The new helm inspect command allows users to preview chart information before installing a chart: helm inspect kube-charts/alpine-0.1.0
  • Tiller now installs into the kube-system namespace, but can install charts into any namespace it has write access to.
  • Helm supports hooks for pre-install, post-install, pre-upgrade, post-upgrade, pre-delete, and post-delete. With these, you can now attach Kubernetes jobs to release events.

But that is not all!

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8 Aug 2016 in Community Meeting, Helm, Deis Workflow

August 2016 Community Meeting

Stop, demo time!

This month we had two demos from Deis engineers. First, Aaron Schlessinger showed off megaboom which we use to stress our the Workflow logging subsystem.

Second, Helgi Þorbjörnsson showed off Workflow deploying applications with Kubernetes Deployments. We are planning on making this the default strategy in Workflow 2.4.

Workflow 2.3 Release Review

Topping off the Workflow sundae was a quick release review for Workflow 2.3. If you are interested, you may also check out the 2.3 release blog!

Helm and Alpha.3

Keep your eyes peeled for Helm Alpha.3 this week! The team is rounding the bend on the latest Helm release.

Click Play

Until Next Time

Our next community meeting will be Thursday, September 1st, 2016. If you like calendar reminders, click, click, click!

See everyone in September!

9 Jul 2016 in Community Meeting, Helm, Deis Workflow

July 2016 Community Meeting

Bunch of updates this month, we've been busy!

Workflow 2.1 and 2.2

Expanding on the release blog post earlier this week, Deis team members join us and give a little more flavor on the 2.1 release items:

  • AWS Instance Profile Support
  • Support for off-cluster Postgres
  • Advancing application health checks
  • Windows support for Deis Workflow CLI
  • Details on the metrics and log shipping architecture changes

We are shooting to release 2.2 July 20th, 2016 and we've got the following items underway:

  • Merge final few bits required to support OpenStack Swift-flavored object storage (thanks Paul Czarkowski)
  • Support for international domains (thanks HL70)
  • Applications managed via Kubernetes Deployments
  • Install Workflow with Kubernetes Helm rather than Helm Classic
  • Full support for Docker registries on ECR and GCR

Helm Alpha.2 and Alpha.3

Deis Helmer Michelle Noorali runs us through the highlights of Alpha.2 along with a feature rundown for Alpha.3:

  • Initial support for upgrading Helm charts
  • Support for hooks including pre and post install, upgrade and delete hooks
  • Tiller support to manage multiple namespaces
  • Back Tiller storage with ConfigMaps
  • Building process to contribute community charts to official repositories

Click Play

Until Next Time

Our next community meeting will be Thursday, August 4th, 2016. If you like calendar reminders, this would be your jam.

See everyone next month!

24 Jun 2016 in Helm, Annoucement

Helm Alpha.2: Update all the things!

This release marks the second of four planned Alpha releases. We have made a lot of progress (and a lot of changes) since Alpha.1. Here are the highlights:

Features

  • helm lint has gotten a major overhaul. The core architecture is now considered stable, and the linter team is transitioning focus to (a) adding rules, and (b) integrating linting into the chart development workflow.
  • Helm's server-side Tiller component can now be installed into any namespace. Alpha.1 restricted Tiller to the helm namespace. Now Tiller is installed into the user's configured namespace (usually default) by default, but can be installed into any namespace.
  • Values files are now in YAML format (bye-bye TOML). We're experimenting with support for globally scoped variables.
  • Templates now support more functions (Sprig 2.3). We still have a few big changes coming to the template system, but the new docs/examples/nginx template provides a better example of how we envision template support.
  • helm install can now install directly from a chart repository.
  • Helm charts now support .helmignore files, which are similar to .gitignore files, providing a convenient way to tell Helm about files that should not be packaged into the chart.
  • Tiller has liveness and readiness probes for Kubernetes
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26 May 2016 in Helm, Kubernetes, Annoucement

Helm 2 Reaches Alpha 1

This release marks the first in the Helm 2 line. It is an unstable Alpha-quality release that supports the core functionality for the Helm 2 platform.

Helm 2 has two major components:

  • The Helm client, whose responsibility is to provide tooling for working with charts and uploading them to the server.
  • The Tiller server, whose responsibility is to manage releases into the Kubernetes cluster.

Additionally, Helm can fetch charts from remote repositories. A Helm 2 chart repository is simply an HTTP server capable of serving YAML and TGZ files.

As a developer preview, the Alpha 1 release does not have a binary build of its components. The quickest route to get started is to fetch the source, and then run make bootstrap build. To start using Helm, use helm init.

Stay in touch

To keep up with news on Helm, join the #Helm channel on the Kubernetes Slack channel, or join our weekly developer call every Thursday at 9:30-10:00 Pacific.

You are welcome to join! https://engineyard.zoom.us/j/366425549

Click Play

During the May Deis Community meeting I took a few moments to talk about the general direction and core values for the Helm project. Click play for my presentation:

21 Apr 2016 in Deis Workflow, Helm, Wercker, Continuous Deployment

Continuous Deployment With Helm Classic, Deis Workflow, and Wercker

Deis Workflow is already in GA for a while. But what is it like to work with? Well, I created an example repository on GitHub to demo some functionality.

Using this example, we'll build a simple, multi-tier web application using Helm Classic, Deis Workflow, and Wercker for continuous deployment.

When we finish, we'll have:

  • A backend Redis cluster (for storage)
  • A web frontend (installed as a Deis Workflow app) that interacts with Redis via JavaScript
  • Wercker for continuous deployment of your Docker image to Deis Workflow
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14 Jan 2016 in Announcement, Helm, Kubernetes

The Helm 0.3 Release Line Is Here

Helm is a package manager for Kubernetes.

Helm 0.3.0 was released last week, and 0.3.1 was released this week with a few minor bug fixes.

The 0.3 release line of Helm introduces several improvements to linting. It also introduces two new Helm commands: helm generate and helm template. These pave the way for generic template support in Helm, and provide a plugin architecture for implementing arbitrary template engines. Also, Helm charts now have a source: field for specifying a URL to the source used to create the chart's resources.

In addition to these new features, many bugs in the 0.2 release line have been found and fixed. Several parts of the codebase have been refactored for easier maintainability and better testing.

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3 Dec 2015 in Announcement, Helm, Kubernetes

Helm 0.2.0 Released

Since KubeCon 2015, the Helm team has been hard at work bringing you a new release.

Helm 0.2.0 contains numerous bug fixes, some code refactoring, and several enticing new features.

Highlights:

  • Helm has been moved to github.com/helm/helm and the core charts are now at github.com/helm/charts
  • helm lint helps you validate your charts.
  • helm repo add|rm|list lets you easily manage your own chart repositories.
  • Support for Kubernetes 1.1 beta 1 kinds (DaemonSet, Job, etc.) as well as custom kinds.
  • helm install and helm uninstall are smarter! In fact, many commands are improved.
  • Helm now supports git-style plugins.
  • Many, many bug fixes.

We're already hard at work on Helm 0.3 and have some exciting new features in the works.

Follow along on our GitHub Milestone for 0.3.0.

17 Nov 2015 in Helm, Kubernetes

Why Kubernetes Needs Helm

Earlier this week, Deis released Helm—the package manager for Kubernetes. Conceptually similar to Homebrew, Helm makes it easy to install standard workloads on Kubernetes.<!--more-->

But... Kubernetes is a container platform, so why does it need a package manager?

Perhaps looking at OS-level package managers (like Homebrew, apt, yum/rpm, ports, and so on) will help explain the situation.

Why use apt, yum, or homebrew?

Let's take a typical scenario.

I'm sat at the terminal in the chilly server room. I tried the command again: ./configure && make. Page after page of information scrolled across the screen. Apache httpd was building. I flipped open my book to read a few pages while I waited. Several minutes later, I saw the make command fail. I just wanted a stock Apache httpd server, but I couldn't figure the right combination of build flags, nor could I find and install all of the correct dependencies.

In frustration, I gave up and tried the radical approach: I switched operating systems.

Then when the time came to install Apache httpd, I simply typed apt-get install apache. And hey presto! It worked. If I needed to make changes, I could head to the /etc/httpd directory and configure away. But even prior to that I had a functioning web server. Apache httpd was working right out of the box.

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9 Nov 2015 in Helm, Kubernetes, Announcement

Introducing Helm, The Kubernetes Package Manager

We at Deis are really excited about Kubernetes. In fact, we're hard at work building Deis v2 on top of a Kubernetes base. During this integration, we developed a tool that we think seasoned Kubernetes users will enjoy, and newcomers can use as an onramp for running containerized applications. And today, we're thrilled to announce this new tool.

We call it Helm, and it's the first package manager for Kubernetes.

Inspired by Homebrew, apt, and npm, Helm is a tool for working with Kubernetes-powered applications. It works like this:

  • A Helm package is bundled up as a chart.
  • The charts are collected together in a repository that you can search. Helm uses git under the hood for storing and organizing chart data.
  • Using the helm tool, you can find, customize, manage and install these charts.

Helm makes it easy run apps and services inside Kubernetes.

Helm's Goals

We built Helm to help with two things.

First, we want to make it simple to share information about running common apps and services inside of Kubernetes. When we all share our charts, the Kubernetes community at large learns how best to work with Kubernetes. We share information and discover great ways of doing things. And we also make it easier for newcomers to get going. Helm is about growing Kubernetes.

Second, we want to make it easier for teams to manage their Kubernetes manifest files. So we created a tool that eases the process of collaborating on and keeping track of your team's charts. Start with widely available charts, customize them to your team's needs, and then store them in your own version control. Helm is about helping teams.

Kubernetes is a powerful platform. We want to make it easy to manage the apps and services you deploy.

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