17 Dec 2015 in CoreOS

Get Started With CoreOS on OS X

In one of our recent posts we have covered how to install CoreOS with VirtualBox.

In this post, we learn how to run CoreOS without VirtualBox.

This setup is specific to OS X as it uses xhyve, which is built on top of Hypervisor.framework introduced in OS X 10.10.

Install

We’re going to use the CoreOS VM application, which is an independent open source project that bundles CoreOS into a VM for running on OS X.

The CoreOS VM app uses the new corectl tool to manage xhyve-based VMs.

First, download the CoreOS VM app.

The CoreOS VM App does not have many dependencies to download. Everything needed is already included. However, the app will perform some automatic downloads on your behalf., they include CoreOS ISO file needed to run the VM, as well as Docker and fleetctl clients for OS X.

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15 Dec 2015 in KubeCon, Kubernetes

KubeCon Videos, Day One

KubeCon, which took place this November, was the first community conference for users and contributors to Kubernetes. It's goal was to deliver expert technical talks designed to spark creativity and promote Kubernetes education.

As part of our sponsorship of KubeCon, we're happy to be able to post the talk videos. In this post, we're sharing videos from day one of the conference. In the follow-up post, we share the videos from day two.

Two sessions are currently missing. This is the unfortunate result of a sound recording glitch. We're working with an external company to get these ready for release.

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10 Dec 2015 in Research, Analysis, Docker, Containers

The State of Containers and the Future of the Docker Ecosystem

Containers (and in particular, Docker) are getting ever more popular.

A recent report by O’Reilly Media and Ruxit presents interesting findings on the adoption and use patterns of containers and Docker.

For instance: the deployment of containers in production is likely to increase significantly in the short term. The report also highlights that one of the major barriers preventing production adoption has to do with the need for better operations tools. This sort of information may be crucial in guiding decision making on investment and innovation priorities.

This post considers some key aspects of the report. I first present the approach used for the research, then highlight the main findings. I conclude with a quick comparison to similar research reports published during the course of this year.

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8 Dec 2015 in CoreOS, Containers, Fleet, Etcd

Run Self-Sufficient Containers on CoreOS

In my last post we learnt about CoreOS and took a look at the steps needed to install it on your laptop (using VirtualBox). We also learnt CoreOS doesn’t ship a package manager. Instead it comes with Docker pre-installed. So, for every service that you need (e.g. web server, database, cache, and so on) you can just create and use a Docker container for it.

So, what’s the deal with self-sufficient containers?

Containers are self-sufficient by default, right? Well, this depends on what you call self-sufficient. Of course, containers are self-sufficient in that they don’t depend on any software running outside of their logical boundaries. But they need kernel support and computing resources from the host computer.

Let’s see it like this: containers are generally set up on a network with several nodes, with each node running one or more containers. Each container may be self-sufficient, but the node on which the container is supposed to run is not! Nodes may crash or run slow or get disconnected off the network. And in such cases, you need to find out the offline node and re-route the traffic meant for that node to other nodes.

But how do we do that?

Enter CoreOS and three particularly crucial components: systemd, fleet, and etcd.

In this post, we’ll take a look at these three components and learn how they’re used by CoreOS to help you create self-sufficient containers.

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3 Dec 2015 in Announcement, Helm, Kubernetes

Helm 0.2.0 Released

Since KubeCon 2015, the Helm team has been hard at work bringing you a new release.

Helm 0.2.0 contains numerous bug fixes, some code refactoring, and several enticing new features.

Highlights:

  • Helm has been moved to github.com/helm/helm and the core charts are now at github.com/helm/charts
  • helm lint helps you validate your charts.
  • helm repo add|rm|list lets you easily manage your own chart repositories.
  • Support for Kubernetes 1.1 beta 1 kinds (DaemonSet, Job, etc.) as well as custom kinds.
  • helm install and helm uninstall are smarter! In fact, many commands are improved.
  • Helm now supports git-style plugins.
  • Many, many bug fixes.

We're already hard at work on Helm 0.3 and have some exciting new features in the works.

Follow along on our GitHub Milestone for 0.3.0.